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The Garden District of New Orleans is as old as the city itself. In 1832 the first homes were built in what is now known as the Garden district. Boundaries of the district are St. Charles Avenue to Magazine Street and Jackson Avenue to Louisiana Avenue. Wealthy American’s hoped to separate themselves from their European neighbors by purchasing large lots and building homes in the Greek and Victorian styles in the early 19th century. Because of their large lot sizes gorgeous gardens had room to grow and be cultivated, thus giving the neighborhood its name. The best way to see and experience the gardens is…
New Orleans is among the oldest cities in the US and it has gained popularity from its yearly festivals such as the Mardi Gras Festival. The city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 that caused a great damage to various parts of the city. In spite of the disaster, New Orleans returned to its normal pace and is still catering the needs of residents and tourists alike. If you’re planning to spend a vacation in New Orleans, you’ll be glad to know that it features fabulous attractions and has a rich culture. Once you step in the place, you’ll realize that there are a…
The New Orleans streetcars are designated moving national historic landmarks and they have been transporting passengers for over 165 years. So as a double treat take a ride on these historic vehicles and get to see some of the city as well. St. Charles streetcar is probably the most popular of the New Orleans streetcars because of its pleasant route along the edge of the French Quarter and down picturesque avenues shaded by old oak trees. The St. Charles Streetcar was originally called Carrollton Railroad as it carries passengers to Carrollton Avenue and it first took to the roads in 1835. The streetcars are maintained…
New Orleans is home to a rich African American and Indian history, and the Backstreet Cultural Museum exemplifies this history. The Backstreet Cultural Museum is located in the oldest African American neighborhood in the country right in the heart of New Orleans in Treme section. The bond between African American slaves and Indians grew when runaway slaves sought shelter in the nearby Indian tribes during the 18th and 19th centuries. As time moved forward African Americans continued to bond with the Native American culture, and today the result has been a thriving culture with its own style and artifacts. The tribes in the surrounding areas…
The Louisiana Children’s Museum opened in 1986. Since then it has helped educate and entertain 147,000 people per year. Families that come to visit New Orleans often check out the historical sites, which sometimes can be boring to kids. So it’s great to know that the Louisiana Children’s Museum is located on Julia Street to open their mind and keep them busy, too. Locals enjoy the exhibits and activities as much as visitors do. Kids can participate with interactive exhibits to learn math concepts, improve reading skills, learn about architectural ideas and even learn about grocery shopping, believe it or not. There are also camps…
Adjacent to the Museum of Art is a stunning sculpture garden made to display sculptures in a natural outdoor environment. The Sculpture Garden of New Orleans opened in 2003 on a 5-acre site and contains more than 50 contemporary sculptures. Most of the collections of sculptures were given by Sydney as well as Walda Besthoff, who began collecting 20th century sculptures in the year 1973. They donated their collection to the Museum of Art that made the site available and together with the help of other donors, the necessary fund for its construction was acquired. In 2005, 30% of the garden was damaged by Hurricane…
Jackson Square in New Orleans' French Quarter is one of the city's essential must-see sites. In the 1720s French colonials knew the area as Place d'Armes an open public space. In 1815, following the Battle of New Orleans, it was renamed after US General Andrew Jackson and became a public park. The square is location overlooking the Mississippi River but due to floods in the late 19th century a high levee was raised to protect the city, which literally made the riverside inaccessible from the city. Fires in the 1700s destroyed the square's French colonial buildings and today the buildings surrounding the square are from…
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