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Iwo Jima (Marine Corps War Memorial)

Iwo Jima Memorial Iwo Jima Memorial Photo by Kazuhisa OTSUBO via Flickr

In the 19th of February 1945, a place on the Pacific called IWO Jima controlled by the Japanese army was invaded by 70,000 marines. It is said that the island was a strategic point of the Japanese air force because its air field was used by the Japanese suicide pilots or kamikaze for attacks. It was believed by allied forces back then that if the island was captured, any further kamikaze attacks will be prevented and it can be also be used again as a base for the Allied forces to keep a closer surveillance to the Japanese forces and attack them by B-29 Super fortresses in case of threatening situations.

The fierce battle for the said strategic island lead many allied and axis soldiers to their graves. These unsound heroes of that tragic day were remembered today with the Iwo Jima Memorial sculpture. It was a memorial that stood 32 feet tall in the air and was conceptualized by a winning photographer as one of the few historic battles that took place in the Second World War.

The island is located in the south of Tokyo, Japan. It was also the last recaptured territory of the U.S troops in the country. The Iwo Jima Memorial recreates a scene where a bronze flag pole and the flag of the USA are being raised by a corpsman of the Navy Hospital and Five brave marine soldiers. This event is the sign that the battle was won and turned out a success and became one of the reasons why the war ended in 1945.

The monument became an emblem of the sacrifices made by soldiers where they will be remembered in the immortals words that say "In honor and in memory of the men of the United States Marine Corps who have given their lives to their country since November 10, 1775."

Information

Hours:
Open 24 hours daily. 
Marine Sunset Review Parade - Tues 7 to 8:30pm (May through Aug)
Address/Map:     Arlington Blvd, Arlington, VA 22209
Phone: (703) 289-2500
Website: Iwo Jima Memorial
   
Admission: Free