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The Boston Duck Tour is a unique and exciting way to see the city from a totally new viewpoint. The DUCK itself is a World War II style amphibious land vehicle; this means that it can take you on the land and in the water. The tour begins with a cruise along the Boston shore passing by many of the landmarks which make the city the birthplace of freedom and a city of "firsts". Some of the sites you'll see along the way include the State House with its golden dome; Bunker Hill; Boston Common; Copey Square; TD Banknorth Garden Quincy Market and Prudential Tower.…
Harvard University has given us a wonderful place to visit, the Arnold Arboretum. This gives you the chance to learn more about plants and to see all of the amazing things that they make possible. Even if you have little interest in plants themselves, this will be an incredible experience. Take a tour through all that they can do and the major role that they play in our lives. Develop a much deeper understanding of them and enjoy their appearance. It is a beautiful and wonderful way to spend your time, as well as an educational one. You are going to be learning something new…
Boston Harbor has seven islands within it, though George's Island is easily the most accessible. With a ferry providing service to the 39 acre island May thru October, its initial intent was to be a defensive fort. Called Fort Warren, it instead became a place for training troops and even served as a prison during the Civil War. Decommissioned after World War II, the island is now a unique park that is fun to explore. With picnic shelters, a snack shop that features seafood, and plenty of exhibits about the history of the island available, a trip to George's Island will make for a great…
Boston Massachusetts is home to some of the most historic places in all of the United States. As a college town it is most notably seen as a tourist spot for party goers and those looking for a place to ‘enjoy’ themselves. But one would be amiss to overlook the rich history that resides at the heart of the city. A 2.5 mile long walking trail in the middle of Boston gives tourist an eye opening hands on tour of important historic sites that made the country what it is today. 16 exciting sites are located along the trail and below we give you a…
Newbury Street was once the bottom of the harbor, literally. Up until the mid 1800’s this fabulous one mile long stretch that is now Newbury Street was a part of the Boston Harbor. The harbor was gradually filled in, starting in 1857, and was to become the Back Bay area of Boston. Just about all of the buildings in this area were built at the same time, and they all have a European feel about them. This area became a very prestigious place to live, all the homes here were larger and equipped with the all the modern conveniences of the time. The exact time…
There are various spectacular sceneries as well as tourist attractions that Boston, Massachusetts boasts. One of the most amazing tourist spots in Boston is the Bunker Hill Monument. It was made to honor the Battle of Bunker Hill. Bunker Hill Monument, obelisk granite standing at 221 feet, was built in Charlestown, Massachusetts from 1827 to 1843. There are two hundred forty-four steps to the top of Bunker Hill Monument. However, it isn’t on Bunker Hill but rather on Breed’s Hill wherein a lot of battles took place and misnamed as Battle of Bunker Hill. It is also the first monument built in the US. Battle…
A trip to Boston would not be complete without swinging by the beautiful Boston Public Garden. This unique park was the first botanical garden in America, introduced by Victorians in the 19th century. When paired with the Boston Common, these two parks create the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long formation of parks strung together by Frederick Law Olmsted. The garden is unique in its variety of plantings, from charming, native trees to enchanting, imported ones. A few of the trees you will find include weeping willows, a Kentucky coffee tree, gingko trees, European and American elms, and even a California redwood. Although…
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